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An important note from Basic Rights Oregon about Measures 66 and 67

CRITICAL SERVICES FOR GAY COMMUNITY FACE MAJOR CUTBACKS

New report documents devastating impact for gay and transgender Oregonians if Measures 66 and 67 fail

(PORTLAND, OREGON – FRIDAY, JANUARY 8, 2010) – As ballots begin arriving in mailboxes around the state, Basic Rights Oregon today distributed a new report documenting the impact of budget cuts expected if Measures 66 and 67 fail.
According to the study, released by the Williams Institute at UCLA, tens of thousands of lesbian, gay and bisexual Oregonians face severe cuts to critical services like HIV treatment and prevention, civil rights enforcement, mental health programs, education and public safety if Oregon voters do not pass Measures 66 and 67 in the January election.

In a dramatic illustration of the impact of failing to pass Measures 66 and 67, the Oregon Department of Human Services predicts that cuts to HIV testing and treatment program could result in 35 additional Oregon deaths.

“For many gay and transgender Oregonians who will lose critical services, this is literally a life or death election,” said Jeana Frazzini, executive director of Basic Rights Oregon.  She added, “We can’t afford to lose.  We have to vote Yes on Measures 66 and 67.”

Highlights of the report include an analysis of the American Community Survey and other sources indicating that 12,000 poor and low-income LGBT Oregonians rely on public services that face cuts.

“It is critical that Oregonians vote yes on Measures 66 and 67,” said Michael Kaplan, executive director of Cascade AIDS Project.  “Should these measures fail, we will be looking at drastic cuts to a broad net of services that our communities and our clients rely on.”

Basic Rights Oregon is the state’s leading advocacy organization working to ensure that lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender Oregonians experience equality.  The Williams Institute at UCLA is the nation’s leading research organization studying sexual orientation law and public policy.

Read the full UCLA Report on Measures 66-67 Jan 2010

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